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Parts Obeah Storyteller

30th Installment of Obeah

Akosua, Kwao, Lassette and the two warriors were cutting their way through the jungle. Kwao was not his talkative self. He sulked all the way from where they had spent the night. Lassette walked alongside Akosua,

“What is his problem today?” She asked. Akosua hesitated for a second.

“Just being his usual self,” she replied. Lassette walked for a second as if trying to figure out what to say next.

“How much further to your village?” she asked trying to keep up with Akosua.

“About a day’s walk form here,” Akosua said,

“A whole day?” Lassette said as she took a deep breath. Akosua smiled and looked at her,

“We will stop for a rest soon.” She said still smiling.

“Did you learn your religion from your mother?” Lassette asked.

“Yes, our parents took advantage of our freedom and taught us about our homeland. That is how we learned about Obeah. Most of us kids were born in the New World. We were raised worshipping the plantation owner’s god. You said you have seen one of our services?” Akosua asked. Lassette smiled glad that Akosua had spoken to her.

“Yes on the island before the rebellion I witnessed a service. I was a curious child. One night I snuck out of the house and followed the sound of the drums. I saw the slaves chanting and dancing. I was spellbound by what I saw and heard. The beat of the drums made my heart beat faster, the share intensity of the slaves as they prayed. I was intrigued. I attended several services without my parents finding out. But they soon did, that is why they disowned me. They took me to their church so the priest can pray for me I spent many of days in confessionals, but I still went to the services. My father said I was a disgrace to the family they tried to send me back to the Old Country so I ran away. Those Obeah services are what sent me on the path to trying to help free the slaves.” She looked ahead; Kwao had stopped and stood with his index finger to his lips. They listened, the leaves rustled in the wind, the flapping of wings echoed overhead. A duck quaked and waddled through the bushes next to them. When Kwao was satisfied there was no danger he started walking without saying a word. Akosua looked at Lasette; she had a puzzled expression on her face. They started walking, Lassette continued talking,

“Why did you not tell me this last night?” Akosua asked. Lassette looked into the jungle,

“Because I get the reaction that Kwao gave whenever I mention fighting for the slaves’ freedom or attending Obeah services” she said and they were silent for a second. Before Akosua could say anything, Lassette turned to her and looked her in the eye for the first time since the night before.

“If you are the leader of your village, then who is in charge while you are gone?” she asked, more for conversation than wanting to know.

“Adofo,” Akosua said smiling. Lassette reached out and patted Akosua on her arm.

“You are in love,” she said, Akosua looked down to the ground embarrassed.

“I can use butterflies to fly, I can change some people from evil to good, but nothing feels like when am around him.” She said,

“Tell me about him,” Lassette said walking alongside Akosua. Akosua started to talk about Adofo when Kwao abruptly stopped. A large snake hung from a tree branch in front of him. The boy swung his machete cutting the snake in half. He picked up the body of the severed snake and turned to Akosua and Lassette,

“If you two girls were not jabbering I would have seen it sooner and would not have had to kill it.” He said angrily. Akosua took a step towards him,

“Do not forget who is in charge Kwao,” she said. Kwao stared at her like he was about to say something. The two boys stepped up behind Akosua and Lassette. Kwao looked at them still contemplating if he should say something.

“You don’t have to listen to us just pay attention to what you are doing.” Akosua said. Kwoa hesitated, but turned stepped over the dead snake and walked off. Akosua Lassette and the warriors followed.

“Jealousy is a dangerous thing,” she said whispering.

Akosua did not say anything she stared into the jungle, a faraway look in her eyes. A parrot squawked in the trees as they walked.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

29th installment of OBEAH

It was two in the morning, the skies twinkled with stars and owls hooted in the jungle. Akosua was asleep on a straw mat under a tree with big leaves when she felt the presence of someone next to her. She opened her eyes, but there was no one there. She went back to sleep. Suddenly there was a face next to her. Most of the face was human, but the mouth and the nose were that of a wolf. The creature opened its mouth, its fangs bared. Saliva dripped and landed on the dirt next to Akosua’s face. She felt its breath against her neck; the stench permeated the air around her, an animalistic odor that stifled her. She sat up and looked around. The jungle was silent, the fire smoldered in its small pit. She looked over at the others, the warrior sand Lassette were asleep on their mats. Kwao sat against a tree rubbing his eyes as if he had just woken up. He looked over at her,

“Having a nightmare?” he asked. Akosua yawned then spoke,

“Not sure,” she said, “It seemed so real,”

“It was not real, I would protect you if it was,” Kwao said, his eyes sparkled red in the yellow light form the dying fire. He smiled but in the dim light, it looked more like a menacing glare.

“You should get some sleep we have to make it back to the village tomorrow.” Akosua said. Kwao looked at her, his head was tilted downwards, the blacks of his eyes turned up.

“Why wouldn’t you let me love you? I can give you all that you want in life. Adofo is just a dumb warrior; I have the emotions to make you feel loved.” He said Akosua sat up, a firefly floated in the air between them.

“Kwao you have to stop this we are friends, at least I would like to think that we are. But there can never be anything more than that between us.” She said. Kwao got up and walked over to her and sat down.

“I have always loved you, seeing you with him hurt my heart,” he said as he caressed her face. She pulled back a little, but that did not detour Kwao’s advances. He leaned in; his eyes closed and tried to kiss her. Akosua jerked away and scrambled to her feet. Kwao sat; his hand still outstretched looking up at her.

“Go to sleep Kwao, I will forget this ever happened.” She said her face hot with embarrassment. Kwao stood up and hesitated like he was about to say something. A flock of bats flew from one tree to the next screeching. Kwao did not say anything, he just turned and walked back over to the tree and sat down.

Akosua walked over to where the warriors and Lassette lay and sat down against a tree. The sky was dark; there were no stars, no moon, just darkness. The leaves in the trees whistled as a slight breeze blew through the jungle. Akosua thought of Adofo. She wondered what he and the other villagers were doing. Did the Ligaroos attack while she was gone? A star shot across the sky leaving a streak of white in its wake. Akosua fell asleep looking up at the sky.

Adofo and Henry were walking on a cliff that overlooked the ocean. They had decided to take a different route to the Bokor’s village to avoid any sneak attacks by the evil spirits. The sea water was dark but frothy white where the waves crashed into the rocks. The sun shined down causing the ocean to glitter blinding Henry whenever he looked out to sea. Flying fish jumped out of the water, flocks of seagulls soared just over the surface. Adofo stopped and looked out at the ocean. He saw five dark spots in the distance gliding towards the island. He put his hand over his eyes to shield the sun and squinted to get a better look.

“What is it?” Henry asked. Adofo looked for a second.

“Don’t know looks like small boats to me,” he said. Henry placed his hand over his eyes and looked out onto the ocean.

“Boats, do you think the Ligaroos are coming to attack?” He asked.

“I doubt it, they only attack at night, but the Ligaroo king has enough power to change that. He can use anyone to attack us.” He said. They stood and watched as the boats came closer to Akan Island.

“Lets go, we have to warn Akosua and the others.” He said as he turned away from the ocean and headed towards the jungle.

“We will go the way Akosua would use to get back to the village.” He said as he walked away from the cliff.

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Pics with verse Storyteller

Good Marning Neighbours

Good Marning Neighbours

Yes man, its time to rise and shine, hear the birds them, see the sun rise, watch the fishermen them go out to see, hear the stevedores them unloading the cargo ship. Yes man, its a tropical morning, it may seem all the same to you, but listen, you could hear the difference. Yesterday, someone was playing reggae music, today, I hear a little calypso. Today, Miss Mabel selling golden apples not mangoes, and in the market square, they is more green figs (bananas) than ripe ones. Yes man, its a brand now day. Wake up and live.

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Storyteller

Good Morning Neighbours

Ahhhhh now dat is an island,

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Storyteller

Just serene

Just serene

A quiet Sunday Afternoon in the city..

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

Electric Ocean From Obeah

They had gotten to where the ocean was waist deep and they saw the outline of the breach despite the fog. Suddenly the ocean behind them lit up with snake like lights. Henry turned around, and for a second the lights stopped, and then started glidingtowards them again.

“Run or they will fry you!” Donkor shouted. Henry ran for the beach splashing water as he went. He struggled to keep his footing. At one point, he ran in water that was waist, deep then suddenly, he was chest deep fighting against the powerful current. Somehow he got to the beach and flopped down. The last one of the Bokors got caught in the swirl of attacking lights and he cried out. Adofo reached out with his spear and the man managed to grab onto it. They pulled him to the shore and dragged his unconscious body onto the sand. He coughed and water squirted out of his mouth. Henry looked down at the man; there were a long burn down the side of his body. Akosua walked up to the man, and took a small sack from her belt and got out some leaves. She rubbed the leaves on the man’s wounds and he stopped screaming. Henry sat up gasping for air and looked out at the ocean. The glowing lights had stopped just before the ocean touched the beach; their yellow glows looked misty in the murky water.

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Pics with verse Storyteller

Good Morning

Good Morning

May your day be filled with blue skies, with cotton candy clouds, sunshine that lights up your world and others, a song, nothing specific, just any song that makes you smile. Though it may be just a dream, as you battle through the cold morning, it may help put warmth in your spirit.

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POEMS Storyteller

Island

Island

Take me to where the sun sets orange over the ocean, take me to a place where the moon hangs like a halo over my head, where the rain is warm, and the fruit is sweet, take me to the island in the sun

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Pics with verse Storyteller

Land in the middle

Land in the middle

From the outside looking in, floating on water, suspended in clouds.

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Pics with verse Storyteller

Best beach in the world

Best beach in the world

Every Saturday when I was a kid, you would find me sitting right on this spot, taking in the sunshine, watching the cruise ships unload its passengers, then later in the day, when the sun was about to go down, I would watch the fishermen pull in their nets, their dark bodies glistening in the retreating sunlight, their singing waking up lazy dogs in the village. Then when the fisherman were done, and the confusion of commerce died down, the sound of steeldrums in the moonlight night.