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Storyteller

Sunday Simmer day

Ahhhh Sunday, I think I will just float around this pond, blind the humans with my milk white feathers. Glide across this silver blue. Create ripples that twinkle in the early morning sun. Gracefully flap my wings causing pellets to sparkle orange in the sunlight. Eat your heart out humans, you only wish you can create beauty like me.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

36th Installment of Obeah

He was asleep just a short time when he was woken up by Ampah. He got up and followed the boy outside. Several of the villagers carried torches and were screaming a name. Henry walked over to Ampah. He stood next to some of the boys giving them instructions.

“Whats going on?” Henry asked and Ampah turned to him.

“Adwoa is missing,” Ampah said.

“Grab a touch, we are going to look for her,” Ampah said. Henry walked over to one of the huts and got one of the torches that sat in front of it. He walked back to Ampah and lit it with the one that Ampah held.

“Adwao!” they shouted. The jungle was dark except for the torches that seemed to float through the air between the bushes. Rodents rustled in the underbrush, owls hooted in the trees, bats screeched and flew off into the night. They searched for hours, combing the underbrush until someone shouted,

“Over here!” footsteps sped up as they rushed to the voice. Henry got to where the voice came from and looked down into a grove of small trees. The little girl lay under a hibiscus tree motionless. Akosua was on her knees next to her.

“She is gone,” she said as she caressed the child’s face. The jungle was silent except for the cracking of the fire from the torches. They stood, their faces illuminated by with shadows. Akosua picked up the girls lifeless body and carried her back to one of the huts next to her own.

The Villagers stood, some cried, while the older ones tried to console them. Henry and Ampah stood there for a while then walked back to Henry’s hut.

“She looked like all the blood was drawn from her body,” Ampah said, his face a mere shadow in the pale yellow light.

“I did not hear the Ligaroos attack,” Henry said.

“There must be one among us,” Ampah said and they sat in the chairs outside Henry’s hut for a second listening to the jungle.

I can’t wait to get my hands on a Ligaroo,” Henry said. Ampah was silent for a moment looking into the dark jungle.

“So do I, I will spill blood for every person who died at their hands,” he said. The sound of frogs croaking filled the silence, crying could be heard in the hut next door.

“I knew something was up, the other night, while I slept, I felt someone next to me, their breath was awful, but when I woke up, there was no one there,” Ampah said.

“The same thing happened to me,” Henry said. Ampah looked over at him and said nonchalantly.

“You should sleep with one eye open, and your machete near my friend,” and got up and walked away. Henry got up and walked into his hut. He stopped at the doorway and held the torch out in front of him. When he was satisfied that no one else was in there he walked in. He took the unlit torch from its holder and placed the lit one in it. He walked over to the chair where the machete lay, picked it up and went to his bed. A dog howled and he lifted his head and looked around. Whenever the wind blew shadows rushed at him, then retreated when the wind dissipated He rested his head back down and closed his eye. The image of the Adwao imprinted in his mind. He felt himself falling asleep and jerked awake, then felt around in the bed next to him for the machete. He hugged the weapon and soon fell asleep.

Adwoa was buried next to the pond the following day. The drummers played, a slow deliberate beat, as they carried her body from the centre of the village to where she was buried. The village was Salome for a couple of days. Some of the villagers looked at each other suspiciously. No one accused anyone, but it was obvious what they were thinking. Henry had not seen Akosua; she had walked into the jungle after the child was buried.

Akosua sat on a bamboo chair looking out at the pond. There was an empty chair next to her with a calabash bowl of food on it. The scent of the roasted chicken filled the air attracting bugs. They settled on the rice in clusters, buzzing as they fed, Akosua had not touched the food. Frogs jumped in and out of the murky pond, ducks and swans glided across the surface. Akosua was in deep thought when a thick fog appeared over the pond. At first, she ignored the change, but then a figure walked towards her. She sat up and looked. It was a woman. She was light skinned and beautiful, and she glided across the pond like a princess gliding down the aisle on her wedding day. The woman stepped onto the ground. The fog dissipated, and Akosua saw the face of Yemaya. The girl smiled as the Loa walked up the bank of the pond and stopped in front of her.

“Hello my child,” Yemaya said. Akosua reached out her hand and Yemaya took it. Akosua thought the palm of her hand was unusually coarse, after all, Yemaya was a gentile. Akosua picked up the calabash bowl of food and Yemaya sat down next to her. Her white dress brushed the top of the blades of grass as she sat gracefully. She looked at Akosua.

“I see that you have had a hard time lately. How have you been doing?” she asked Akosua fought back tears.

“Its o k dear go ahead and let it out,” Yemaya said. Akosua rested her head on Yemaya’s head and sobbed.

“This is hard, I don’t know if I am the one to do this.” Akosua said between tears. Yemaya ran her fingers through Akosua’s hair.

“Maybe you are not my dear,” she said. Akosua lifted her head and looked at the Loa. Yemaya looked into her eyes,

“Maybe you are not the chosen one,” she insisted. Akosua wiped the tears.

“But you said….,” Akosua began to say.

“Never mind what I said child, even us Loas can be wrong.” Yemaya said, Akosua stood up and looked down at the woman.

“I am sorry, but maybe you are too weak to lead your village into a battle with the Ligaroo King.” Akosua walked to the edge of the pond, the fog partially engulfed her. Akosua looked back at Yemaya, she sat stoic, no expression on her face. Maybe she was right; maybe she was not strong enough to take on the responsibility of leading her people to freedom. Out of the fog, a swan floated towards her on the water. Akosua turned to Yemaya.

“If not me then who?” She asked, The Loa smiled at her.

“Don’t worry us good spirits will find someone else. We have the power to choose,” Yemaya said. Akosua looked down at the woman; the Loa was looking at the ground. Akosua looked at the Loas fingers, the three wedding bands that she usually wore were missing. Akosua sat down.

“It is good to have you help me work through these hard times.” She said. Yemaya smiled. Akosua looked around, and then looked down at the calabash of food she had laid down on the grass. She reached down and picked it up.

“You look hungry here have a bite to eat.” She said. Yemaya looked at the food and seemed like she was going to throw up. She took the calabash bowl and set it on her lap, picked up a piece of chicken, and raised it to her mouth. She looked at the food like it was laced with poison, then looked up at Akosua without moving her head, the blacks of her eyes pointed straight up. Suddenly she growled and grinded her teeth. She looked up to the sky and screamed.

“You know I can’t eat food that the cooks have touched.” She screamed and threw the calabash bowl to the ground. Slowly her physical features changed as she screamed and growled. The frogs jumped into the pond, the ducks and swans flapped their wings, as they retreated into the fog that suddenly thickened. The woman looked up at Akosua. Half of her body was Marinette-Bwa-Check, the other half Yemaya. Her eyes were ablaze with anger, her face twisted with contempt and hate. She got up and rushed at Akosua, the girl backed up until she stood at the edge of the pond, her heels touching the water.

“You little witch, I will cut you up and cook you into a stew and have you for dinner.” She screamed. Saliva shot out of her mouth and landed in the pond. The water bubbled, and steam rose with every drop of saliva. Dead frogs floated to the surface. Akosua stepped to her and reached her hand out. The Loa had completely transformed into Marrinette-Bwa-Check, she jerked away from Akosua, as if afraid to be touched.

“Fire go burn you,” she screamed, Akosua tried to touch her again,

“You don’t have to be evil. You can be the way you used to be in our homeland.” Akosua said. Marrinette-Bwa-Check threw her head back and screamed a loud scream that turned into a laugh, a laugh that turned into a growl. The Loa disappeared across the pond. Birds flew out of the trees and retreated into the jungle. Akosua stood; her hand was still outstretched, her eyes closed.

“You, a mere girl you think you can change me. I have ripped men’s hearts out and fed them to the animals. What do you think I will do to you child?” she screamed. Akosua opened her eyes and looked at the Evil Loa. Marrinette_Bwa_Check trembled then backed away from Akosua.

“You will be destroyed, you will be destroyed!” she screamed, as she ran to the pond and disappeared into the fog leaving ripples on the water. The jungle was silent, as if every animal was hiding from the wrath of the evil Loa. Slowly, the fog went away. The dragon flies came back and buzzed around the pond, frogs croaked and hopped from Lilly to Lilly. The bodies of the dead frogs had disappeared with the evil Loa, and the pond was back to its serene peace. Akosua turned away from the pond and slowly walked back to the village.

Categories
Parts Obeah Storyteller

22nd installment of Obeah

It was silent for a second, then the surface of the pond rippled, and a head emerged. Its face was androgynous, auburn hair, grey coloured eyes that was blank but looked almost innocent. Slowly the creature moved towards them. They prepared themselves for an attack. Henry hopped he remembered all that Adofo and Ampah had taught him. The creature’s ebony coloured chest appeared. Its dark skin glistened as the sun bounced off the pellets of water that rolled down its body. The creature stopped and looked at the warriors. There was still a piece of the pig hanging from its shoulder. Henry stood behind Adofo, sweat rolled into his eyes, but he was too afraid to move, so he blinked trying to squeeze it out. The creature stepped out of the pond and stopped just outside the rippling water. The creature’s legs were that of a monkey’s, but it stood well over six feet tall. Its tail followed wiggling around in the mud, leaving a swirly path in its wake. For a second the creature and the warriors stood and looked at each other.

“What is it?” Henry asked.

“I don’t know.” Adofo said his voice a whisper. Ampah spoke but, at first only a crackling sound came out. He cleared his throat.

“I don’t know but I don’t think it wants to make friends.” He said his spear ready to be thrown. The creature raised its tail above its head like a cobra ready to strike. The hand slowly emerged from the tip of it and made a fist. Adofo motioned for his friends to form a half circle around it. The creature tilted its head back as if to roar, but cried like a grown man trapped in a grave unable to free himself. Its voice echoed through the jungle sending wild animals scampering to hide. Henry was having a hard time keeping his grip on his machete. His palms were sweating profusely.

The creature stopped crying and looked at them, and for a second it looked like it was asking for their help. Suddenly it charged, Adofo charged towards it his spear held high. Before he could throw the spear the creature flicked its tail. Adofo floated through the air and landed on some bushes, branches broke, bugs fluttered into the air as he landed. The creature turned its attention to Henry. He wanted to stand his ground, but was petrified and turned to run. Ampah saw his chance and threw his spear and the creature cried out in pain. Henry stopped and turned back to the creature. It was trying to pull the spear from its leg. Henry took a deep breath and charged but the creature flicked its tail hitting him on the shoulder. He sailed through the air and landed in a tree, he fell hitting every branch as he did, and he ended up hanging on a branch about three feet from the ground.

The creature stumbled still trying to pull the spear from its leg. Adofo charged and buried his spear in its other leg. The creature screamed and fell backwards. Ampah ran up to it, set his foot on its leg, and pulled his spear out. The creature screamed in pain and for a second it sounded like it was pleading for its life. Henry scrambled to retrieve his machete and ran over to help. He was almost to the creature when it raised its tail and took aim at Ampah. Henry dove into the air swinging his machete. He heard the creature scream as the machete sliced through its tail. Ampah had his spear in his hand; he stuck it into the creature’s chest. Adofo walked up and helped Henry to his feet.

“For a second I thought you grew wings,” he said laughing

“I was driven by fear my friend,” Henry said Ampah stood his right foot on top of the creature. The villagers stood over the lifeless beast.

“Where do you think it came from?” Henry asked. Adofo took a deep breath,

“I have no clue, but I bet the Ligaroos have something to do with it.” He said. Ampah pulled his spear from the creature’s chest. They stood over it for a second then turned and walked away. They had went about four feet when the bushes began to rustle. They turned around. The creature’s body had melted into the tall grass. They ran back to where it lay and to their surprise the creature had transformed into a human being. Ampah knelt down next to the man; his skin was as dark as midnight, his body was ropey with muscles and he had salt and pepper hair. His dark eyes were open wide with fear.

“I know him,” Ampah said, “He was on the ship with us,” Adofo bent down to get a better look at the man.

“I remember him he was taken with our parents. The Ligaroo is using the power of the Pedro Loa to create monsters of their captives.” He said and they were silent for a second.

“How do we know when it is our family that is the monsters?” Henry asked, Adofo turned to him a sad look in his eyes,

“We don’t,” he said. There was silence again then Henry spoke,

“We should bury him,” he said, Adofo and the others nodded and one by one, they set about the solemn task of burying the man.

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Pics with verse Storyteller

Good Marning me Neighbours

Good Marning me Neighbours

Oh sweet Kentucky marning, wey me wake up to de hills engulfed in mist, that hangs over de pond filled with them fresh water fish. Green trees brown grass, the scent of the mountains welcomes me. De bright red cardinals sitting on tree branches, de braying of horses on de horse farm. Oh de ole Kentucky home, where de coal miners toil night and day, and on weekend, when in season, men and boys go deer hunting, and everyone talks about U.K. basketball, as they sit on the hilltop, mere shadows in de mist, over looking de cows on de farm, whistling a chorus in harmony wid de birds .

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

The Creature

They entered the jungle, the leaves from the trees blocked out the sun making it cool in the shade. They walked about two hundred yards to where a pond was. The water was murky, dragon flies darted around the water’s edge, and Frogs crooked, some leaping into the pond creating smell waves. They stopped about fifty yards from the pond and looked around. The crying had gotten louder. Henry covered his ears with his hands dropping the machete he carried. A wild pig walked out of the jungle and walked down to the water’s edge. The pig began to lap water up with its tongue oblivious to the crying, its tail swayed from side to side with content. Henry bent over and picked up his machete. The animal stopped drinking and turned to walk away. The crying stopped and there was dead silence, several frogs jumped out of the pond. In a flash of movement, a large tail popped out of the pond and plopped down on the ground behind the pig. The animal stopped and turned around and sniffed it. The tail flopped around a bit then a hand emerged from the tip of the tail, grabbed the pig and splashed back into the pond.  The villagers gasped, and then the younger ones turned and ran back towards the village. The warriors stood, their spears held above their heads, their machetes at the ready.

It was silent for a second, then the surface of the pond rippled, and a head emerged. Its face was androgynous, auburn hair, grey coloured eyes that was blank but looked almost innocent. Slowly the creature moved towards them. They prepared themselves for an attack. Henry hopped he remembered all that Adofo and Ampah had taught him. The creature’s ebony coloured chest appeared.  Its dark skin glistened as the sun bounced off the pellets of water that rolled down its body. The creature stopped and looked at the warriors. There was still a piece of the pig hanging from its shoulder. Henry stood behind Adofo, sweat rolled into his eyes, but he was too afraid to move, so he blinked trying to squeeze it out. The creature stepped out of the pond and stopped just outside the rippling water. The creature’s legs were that of a monkey’s, but it stood well over six feet tall. Its tail followed wiggling around in the mud, leaving a swirly path in its wake. For a second the creature and the warriors stood and looked at each other.

“What is it?” Henry asked.

“I don’t know but I don’t think it wants to make friends.” He said his spear ready to be thrown. The creature raised its tail above its head like a cobra ready to strike. The hand slowly emerged from the tip of it and made a fist. Adofo motioned for his friends to form a half circle around it. The creature tilted its head back as if to roar, but cried like a grown man trapped in a grave unable to free himself. Its voice echoed through the jungle sending wild animals scampering to hide. Henry was having a hard time keeping his grip on his machete. His palms were sweating profusely.

The creature stopped crying and looked at them, and for a second it looked like it was asking for their help. Suddenly it charged, Adofo charged towards it his spear held high. Before he could throw the spear the creature flicked its tail. Adofo floated through the air and landed on some bushes, branches broke, bugs fluttered into the air as he landed. The creature turned its attention to Henry. He wanted to stand his ground, but was petrified and turned to run. Ampah saw his chance and threw his spear and the creature cried out in pain. Henry stopped and turned back to the creature. It was trying to pull the spear from its leg. Henry took a deep breath and charged but the creature flicked its tail hitting him on the shoulder. He sailed through the air and landed in a tree, he fell hitting every branch as he did, and he ended up hanging on a branch about three feet from the ground.

The creature stumbled still trying to pull the spear from its leg. Adofo charged and buried his spear in its other leg. The creature screamed and fell backwards. Ampah ran up to it, set his foot on its leg, and pulled his spear out. The creature screamed in pain and for a second it sounded like it was pleading for its life.  Henry scrambled to retrieve his machete and ran over to help. He was almost to the creature when it raised its tail and took aim at Ampah. Henry dove into the air swinging his machete. He heard the creature scream as the machete sliced through its tail. Ampah had his spear in his hand; he stuck it into the creature’s chest. Adofo walked up and helped Henry to his feet.

“For a second I thought you grew wings,” he said laughing

“I was driven by fear my friend,” Henry said Ampah stood his right foot on top of the creature. The villagers stood over the lifeless beast.

“Where do you think it came from?” Henry asked. Adofo took a deep breath,

“I have no clue, but I bet the Ligaroos have something to do with it.” He said. Ampah pulled his spear from the creature’s chest. They stood over it for a second then turned and walked away. They had went about four feet when the bushes began to rustle. They turned around. The creature’s body had melted into the tall grass. They ran back to where it lay and to their surprise the creature had transformed into a human being. Ampah knelt down next to the man; his skin was as dark as midnight, his body was ropey with muscles and he had salt and pepper hair. His dark eyes were open wide with fear.

“I know him,” Ampah said, “He was on the ship with us,” Adofo bent down to get a better look at the man.

“I remember him he was taken with our parents. The Ligaroo is using the power of the Pedro Loa to create monsters of their captives.” He said and they were silent for a second.

“How do we know when it is our family that is the monsters?” Henry asked, Adofo turned to him a sad look in his eyes,

“We don’t,” he said. There was silence again then Henry spoke,

“We should bury him,” he said, Adofo and the others nodded and one by one, they set about the solemn task of burying the man