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Parts Obeah Storyteller

From Obeah

Akosua got to the tunnel that led to the path down the mountain, but turned up instead of going down. She walked to a rock that was the highest point on the mountain and looked out at the darkness. She stood and took the spear out of its goat skin holster, and held it up to the sky, and stood there for a second. The spear glowed so Henry positioned himself behind a rock and watched. Akosua stood her head to the sky as she mumbled. Suddenly out of the dark a figure approached her. Henry ran to her, but he slipped on the pebbles on the path and fell. He looked up just in time to see the figure reach out and grab the spear. Akosua tried to hold on to it, but stumbled and fell off the rock. Henry scrambled on his hands and knees trying to get to her.

As he was getting back up to his feet the mountain lit up with a brilliant white light. He stood up and watched the figure; it stood lit up just like Akosua when she first touched the spear. The blinding white reached the sky. And even the stars were like shadows against it. Henry heard the figure laugh as the power of the spear rushed through him. Light shot out of his mouth, as if trying to from the noise that his laughter made. Suddenly the figure screamed, as the light from the spear grew brighter. It lit up the mountain top and the jungle thousands of feet below. Henry looked over the edge, he saw the tops of trees that grew out of the mountain side. Birds soared around the mountain disturbed by the light, wild goats retreated stumbling on the rocks. Henry put his hands over his eyes to protect them from the light. Small white beams penetrated the clouds, giving the impression that solid streaks of raindrops was showering down from the heavens. The figure screamed in pain, as white light exploded from his body making him look translucent, as small beams of white light escaped his body. Henry got to the base of the rock and looked around for Akosua, but did not see her. He began to run towards the figure using his hand to block the light. Just as he was about to reach out and grab the spear Akosua appeared next to him,

“No Henry!” She screamed. Henry stopped and looked at the figure, the light had begun to dim and the mountain top became dark, until it was like before the figure grabbed the spear. Akosua reached out and grabbed the spear and the figure’s hand broke off, its fingers still wrapped around the stem of the spear. Henry stood and watched the figure; it was motionless, like a statue in a Catholic church. There was no more light coming from it, it stood just a dull white glow. Akosua touched it and put her finger on her tongue,

“Pure salt” she said. Slowly the feet of the figure began to crumble and it fell over the side of the mountain, Henry heard it hit the trees on its way down. He walked up to Akosua stood holding the spear

“That was the former Bokor leader. I knew someone had followed us here. It is a shame he could not join us,” she said as she put the spear back in its holster. It hung down her back almost touching the ground.

“Are you O K?” Henry asked. Akosua smiled,

Categories
POEMS Storyteller

Loneliness

The ocean without salt

Air without oxygen

A ballerina without toes

Ice cream without the cream

Love without the passion

Sleep without rest

War without hate

Politics without the lies

Religion without spirituality

laughter without happiness

serenity without peace

A heart without a heartbeat

Everything with nothing

 

 

Categories
Parts Obeah Storyteller

From Obeah

Akosua twisted and turned as she slid down on the salt. She came to a stop looking up at Adofo and Donkor. They took her arms and pulled her up. Henry and the others slid down after her, stood up and looked around. The ceiling of the cave was about twenty feet high. The roof of it was a layer of salt and the sun shined through it, creating a rainbow of colours on the white walls. The cave was salt, just like the white field they had just walked on. On the far side, large rocks of salt stood like steps that went about fifteen feet up. At the top, above the last steps of salt was the only natural rock visible.

“Right there,” Donkor said. Akosua looked up at the rock, its beige colour pronounced against the rocks of salt that surrounded it. She lay her gear down and was about to walk over to the steps when laughter filled the cave. Some of the salt rocks cracked and pieces fell, bounced off the salt floor, rolled towards Henry and stopped at his feet.

“Welcome girl witch,” the voice boomed. It echoed through the cave and Akosua looked around to see where it had come from. A man stepped out from behind a salt rock that was shaped like a headstone. It was six feet tall, and as Akosua and her friends watched, a black cross appeared on the front of it. Above the cross were the letters R.I.P, underneath was Akosua’s mother’s name written in red. There were smaller salt rocks surrounding it, they too were shaped like tombstones with the names of each child’s parent on it.

The man wore a black suit, and a black top hat, and dark sunglasses with the right lens knocked out of it. His exposed red eye rolled as he spoke. He used the smaller tombstones as steps to climb onto the bigger one and sat on top of it like a king on his throne.

“This is the perfect spot to sit and watch this momentous occasion. Little witch retrieves Spear of Salt so that she can save her people,” Guede said then threw his head back and laughed. Akosua stood calm and smiled, her eyes never moving away from the evil Loa,

“You don’t intimidate me, you are just a Lackey for Baron Samedi,” she responded. Guede’s laughter disappeared immediately. He puffed on his cigar then leaned forward.

“Go ahead little lady, go get your spear,” he said, and smiled a devilish smile. Akosua looked back at her friends. Adofo stepped forward.

“I will go with you,” he said, but Akosua waived him off.

“I have to do this alone,” She said and took a step.

“Ohhh brave little Obeah Woman,” Guede said and laughed. The salt crunched as Akosua stepped on it, it was the loudest sound she had ever heard, it echoed in her head as she took another step. She stepped lightly, but her left foot sank to her ankle in the salt and was slowly sinking more.

“Watch it now; you already stuck your foot in your mouth by challenging me. Be careful you don’t step into a salty grave.” Guede said and roared with laughter. She struggled to free her foot. Adofo started walking towards her, but once again she raised her hand and he stopped. She was finally able to pull her foot out, small chunks of wet salt rolled off her feet as she shook them one at a time. She steadied herself and took a step. Guede’s smile disappeared again; he had an impatient expression on his face. He looked over at Adofo and the others and then back to Akosua.

“You think you can save lives by getting this spear? Don’t you know that life and death is the biggest joke played on man. That’s why I can use the dead to do my evil works, and I can use the living to do my bidding also.” He boasted then laughed as Amelia took another tentative step. Guede continued talking,

“Ask yourself, are the Jab Jabs dead, or are you and your friends the dead ones. Did I order them to attack you, or is this all one big illusion, and you are actually in the afterlife, and I am in control, and you are doing exactly what I want you to do. Is there a spear over there, or is this just one of my games that I so love to play?” Akosua stopped and looked at him.

“As sure as I am standing here that spear exists, Yemaya says so,” she said and Guede rolled his exposed eye.

“Yemaya, Yemaya. She is no real Loa. She is loose and she is a trickster. Why would you believe her?” He asked staring at Akosua. She took another step then looked over at Guede,

“My mother brought it here Donkor can attest to that.” She said and took another step. Guede looked over at Donkor.

“Who him, the Bokor,” Guede clapped his hand and laughed, a red teardrop rolled out of his eyes,

“Hi old friend, been to any sacrifices lately. What, are you all of a sudden a good little Hougan. I seem to remember wanting my help. Remember the services, the food, and the human offerings. Thank you I was hungry for food, or hungry for souls, and you were quite willing to satisfy me.” he winked at Donkor, the man shifted from one leg to the next nervously.

“Look how nervous he is, do you think you can trust him?” Guede said,. Akosua looked over at Donkor and gave him a reassuring smile. She took another step, her legs shook a little. Guede sucked his teeth, shook his head, and then sneezed. The ground moved violently and Henry and his friends fell. Akosua braced herself, her hand stretched out at her sides for balance. The salt floor began to crack as the cave rumbled.

Categories
Parts Obeah Storyteller

From the novel Obeah

Later that night, as they lay dozing under the night sky, Henry saw Akosua pick up the spear and walk off into the night. He got up and followed her silhouette into the bushes. Just before she entered the jungle she stopped and looked back. Henry dropped to the ground and lay still. Akosua smiled in the dark, then turned and kept walking. Henry got up and followed her into the jungle.

Akosua got to the tunnel that led to the path down the mountain, but turned up instead of going down. She walked to a rock that was the highest point on the mountain and looked out at the darkness. She stood and took the spear out of its goat skin holster, and held it up to the sky, and stood there for a second. The spear glowed so Henry positioned himself behind a rock and watched. Akosua stood her head to the sky as she mumbled. Suddenly out of the dark a figure approached her. Henry ran to her, but he slipped on the pebbles on the path and fell. He looked up just in time to see the figure reach out and grab the spear. Akosua tried to hold on to it, but stumbled and fell off the rock. Henry scrambled on his hands and knees trying to get to her.

As he was getting back up to his feet the mountain lit up with a brilliant white light. He stood up and watched the figure; it stood lit up just like Akosua when she first touched the spear. The blinding white reached the sky. And even the stars were like shadows against it. Henry heard the figure laugh as the power of the spear rushed through him. Light shot out of his mouth, as if trying to from the noise that his laughter made. Suddenly the figure screamed, as the light from the spear grew brighter. It lit up the mountain top and the jungle thousands of feet below. Henry looked over the edge, he saw the tops of trees that grew out of the mountain side. Birds soared around the mountain disturbed by the light, wild goats retreated stumbling on the rocks. Henry put his hands over his eyes to protect them from the light. Small white beams penetrated the clouds, giving the impression that solid streaks of raindrops was showering down from the heavens. The figure screamed in pain, as white light exploded from his body making him look translucent, as small beams of white light escaped his body. Henry got to the base of the rock and looked around for Akosua, but did not see her. He began to run towards the figure using his hand to block the light. Just as he was about to reach out and grab the spear Akosua appeared next to him,

“No Henry!” She screamed. Henry stopped and looked at the figure, the light had begun to dim and the mountain top became dark, until it was like before the figure grabbed the spear. Akosua reached out and grabbed the spear and the figure’s hand broke off, its fingers still wrapped around the stem of the spear. Henry stood and watched the figure; it was motionless, like a statue in a Catholic church. There was no more light coming from it, it stood just a dull white glow. Akosua touched it and put her finger on her tongue,

“Pure salt” she said. Slowly the feet of the figure began to crumble and it fell over the side of the mountain, Henry heard it hit the trees on its way down. He walked up to Akosua stood holding the spear

“That was the former Bokor leader. I knew someone had followed us here. It is a shame he could not join us,” she said as she put the spear back in its holster. It hung down her back almost touching the ground.

“Are you O K?” Henry asked. Akosua smiled,

“Am fine, let’s get back to the camp,” she said and they walked down the path, through the bushes and back to the camp.

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Storyteller

Bambozled at the Cemetary

One of the traditions on all saints night is to go to the cemetary, and light candles, and put them on the graves of family members. We would sit there and tell stories about said family member, laugh at the funny things and talk about the good times. . Now that was not the main attraction for us kids, nooo, the main attraction is the sweet treat  that was made around that time, oh yes, we made sweet treats and sat around graves and talked. Anyway back to the sweet treat. All the fuss over this sweet treat by us kids you would have thought this was some fancy food or something, but no, all it is,  corn, toasted or parched as we say, then while its hot you grind it up and  when it is  fine like cornmeal you add sugar, cinnamon and some people add a little pepper, we call it Asham. ok so here  I was, eight years old, sitting here listening to stories about me Grandfather. I was bored for so. I looked over at the other grave, there were a couple of children there, so I wondered off and went over to them, we slipped away and sat on a grave without candles. “You have the good Asham”* the little girl asked, Wey yuh tink, Me mudda make de best Asham in the whole village, de whole world even,” I said, we all looked down at our brown, one pound paper bags filled with Asham.  The little boy laughed, “Boi yuh mus’ be bazodi you know, me granmuma, she makes the universe’s best Asham you know,” We argued for a while then we shared our Asham with each other trying to determine whose was best. Out of the dark, three older boys, fifteen or sixteen years old, walked up to us and sat down. The one that looked like the ring leader, only because he was bigger than the other two, looked at me and said. “So yuh mudda makes de best Asham eh? I heard some of de women and dem talk and dey say dat is true, yuh mudda make de best,” Eight years old, I did not think to ask him where he heard that, I was smiling real big basking in the attention. He looked over at one of the other boys and shook his head. The boy walked up holding a two pound brown filled with Asham “Yuh know what dis is?” smiling real big, “Dis is me great grandmuma’s Asham, is she yuh mudda learn from you know,” I did not say anything, I was too impressed with that big boy size bag. The boy reached it out to me but, before I took it he pulled it back, “Nah mon, ah not just going give you me Asham, I am talking bout a trade yuh know,” I looked at him, looked at my bag of Asham then looked at his gigantic bag and greed took the better of me. I reached my bag out to him and he dropped his bag in my hand, me hand almosy hit the ground, this big boy bag was heavy form so. He put my bag up to his lips, “Hmmmm dis real good,” he said smacking his lips. “Try me Grandmuma’s nah,” He said smacking his lips even harder, that damn Asham dries up you mouth real fast. I opened the top of the bag, lifted it to my mouth, hell I had to eat it big boy style. The Asham rolled out the bag and a rush of it went into my mouth. Asham rolled out the side of my mouth and onto my pants. I finally was able to get control of the bag and stopped the gush. That was when I realized that this Asham was a little salty. I tried chewing and realized that the Asham was way too crunchy and was getting saltier. I started to cough, raining the fake Asham all over the boy and the girl. The older boys were laughing and pointing. They got up and walked away. I spat and coughed, and when I composed myself, I shined on the bag of Asham and realized that it was sand. Sand, I fell for the best known trick in the book, replace Asham with sand and give it to some unsuspecting person and then laugh. I tell you what, I never fell for that trick again, and I am ashamed to say, I have been the culprit of many of these pranks, No one was safe, old,  young, middle age, I pulled that trick on everyone, also got me ass kicked a few times over that trick.

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Parts Dirty Immigrant Storyteller

Cave of Salt

The man wore a black suit, and a black top hat, and dark sunglasses with the right lens knocked out of it.  His exposed red eye rolled as he spoke. He used the smaller tombstones as steps to climb onto the bigger one and sat on top of it like a king on his throne.

“This is the perfect spot to sit and watch this momentous occasion. Little witch retrieves Spear of Salt so that she can save her people,” Guede said then threw his head back and laughed. Akosua stood calm and smiled, her eyes never moving away from the evil Loa,

“You don’t intimidate me, you are just a Lackey for Baron Samedi,” she responded. Guede’s laughter disappeared immediately. He puffed on his cigar then leaned forward.

“Go ahead little lady, go get your spear,” he said, and smiled a devilish smile. Akosua looked back at her friends. Adofo stepped forward.

“I will go with you,” he said, but Akosua waived him off.

“I have to do this alone,” She said and took a step.

“Ohhh brave little Obeah Woman,” Guede said and laughed. The salt crunched as Akosua stepped on it, it was the loudest sound she had ever heard, it echoed in her head as she took another step. She stepped lightly, but her left foot sank to her ankle in the salt and was slowly sinking more.

“Watch it now; you already stuck your foot in your mouth by challenging me. Be careful you don’t step into a salty grave.” Guede said and roared with laughter. She struggled to free her foot. Adofo started walking towards her, but once again she raised her hand and he stopped. She was finally able to pull her foot out, small chunks of wet salt rolled off her feet as she shook them one at a time. She steadied herself and took a step. Guede’s smile disappeared again; he had an impatient expression on his face. He looked over at Adofo and the others and then back to Akosua.

“You think you can save lives by getting this spear? Don’t you know that life and death is the biggest joke played on man. That’s why I can use the dead to do my evil works, and I can use the living to do my bidding also.” He boasted then laughed as Amelia took another tentative step. Guede continued talking,

“Ask yourself, are the Jab Jabs dead, or are you and your friends the dead ones. Did I order them to attack you, or is this all one big illusion, and you are actually in the afterlife, and I am in control, and you are doing exactly what I want you to do. Is there a spear over there, or is this just one of my games that I so love to play?” Akosua stopped and looked at him.

“As sure as I am standing here that spear exists, Yemaya says so,” she said and Guede rolled his exposed eye.

“Yemaya, Yemaya. She is no real Loa. She is loose and she is a trickster. Why would you believe her?” He asked staring at Akosua. She took another step then looked over at Guede,

“My mother brought it here Donkor can attest to that.” She said and took another step. Guede looked over at Donkor. 

“Who him, the Bokor,” Guede clapped his hand and laughed, a red teardrop rolled out of his eyes,

“Hi old friend, been to any sacrifices lately. What, are you all of a sudden a good little Hougan. I seem to remember wanting my help. Remember the services, the food, and the human offerings. Thank you I was hungry for food, or hungry for souls, and you were quite willing to satisfy me.” he winked at Donkor, the man shifted from one leg to the next nervously.

“Look how nervous he is, do you think you can trust him?” Guede said,. Akosua looked over at Donkor and gave him a reassuring smile. She took another step, her legs shook a little. Guede sucked his teeth, shook his head, and then sneezed. The ground moved violently and Henry and his friends fell. Akosua braced herself, her hand stretched out at her sides for balance. The salt floor began to crack as the cave rumbled “Bloody dry air,” Guede said then coughed. The cave shook some more and larger chunks of salt fell from the ceiling and the walls. Henry and the others scrambled to their feet and backed up against the wall of the cave as rocks fell around them. Akosua steadied herself as the floor cracked under her feet. Guede laughed, but this time it sounded like the boom of a violent thunder storm. The cave rattled, the floor opened up, and Akosua plunged into the bluish white water.

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POEMS Storyteller

On a Snowy day like Today

On a Snowy day like Today

I want to go where the ocean is emerald green, go far out to where you can’t see the land, lay on my back and watch the clouds float by, listen to the steeldrums play in the distance, feel the warm spray of the ocean tickle my face, feel the sun on my skin, so hot a sudden chill runs through me. if I close my eyes I am there, and now I don’t see the snow.

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Pics with verse Storyteller

Ahhhhh

Ahhhhh

Great day to just sit right there, yeah, right there. Feel the sun beat down on you, till you feel like you getting hot, and then, the cool breeze from the ocean hit you skin, yes man, you whole body shiver from the sudden cooling down, then warm again. Yes right there, where the water breaks onto the show, feel little sprinkles of ocean against your face, smell the salt in the air. Yes man, its Sunday, its quiet out there, why not.

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Pics with verse Storyteller

Frist day dream of the day

Frist day dream of the day

Rise and walk to the edge, smell the ocean, taste the salt in the air. Have your first day dream fist thing in the morning.

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Music I like Storyteller

More carnival vibes, Jab Jab

Soca from 2013 carnival.