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This Sunday Obeah Tune in

Ahhhh, looks like the Akans are on their way to get the Spear of Salt. Do you think the Ligaroo king will let them get it, or do you think he will be sending his most gruesome Jumbies to stop them.  I can tell you now, but then again what fun will that be. You must go on the journey with them, you must tune in on Sunday for the 42nd installment of Obeah. Do it because Papa Jumbie say so. Now lay down, sweet dream my little Jumbies.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

22nd installment of Obeah

It was silent for a second, then the surface of the pond rippled, and a head emerged. Its face was androgynous, auburn hair, grey coloured eyes that was blank but looked almost innocent. Slowly the creature moved towards them. They prepared themselves for an attack. Henry hopped he remembered all that Adofo and Ampah had taught him. The creature’s ebony coloured chest appeared. Its dark skin glistened as the sun bounced off the pellets of water that rolled down its body. The creature stopped and looked at the warriors. There was still a piece of the pig hanging from its shoulder. Henry stood behind Adofo, sweat rolled into his eyes, but he was too afraid to move, so he blinked trying to squeeze it out. The creature stepped out of the pond and stopped just outside the rippling water. The creature’s legs were that of a monkey’s, but it stood well over six feet tall. Its tail followed wiggling around in the mud, leaving a swirly path in its wake. For a second the creature and the warriors stood and looked at each other.

“What is it?” Henry asked.

“I don’t know.” Adofo said his voice a whisper. Ampah spoke but, at first only a crackling sound came out. He cleared his throat.

“I don’t know but I don’t think it wants to make friends.” He said his spear ready to be thrown. The creature raised its tail above its head like a cobra ready to strike. The hand slowly emerged from the tip of it and made a fist. Adofo motioned for his friends to form a half circle around it. The creature tilted its head back as if to roar, but cried like a grown man trapped in a grave unable to free himself. Its voice echoed through the jungle sending wild animals scampering to hide. Henry was having a hard time keeping his grip on his machete. His palms were sweating profusely.

The creature stopped crying and looked at them, and for a second it looked like it was asking for their help. Suddenly it charged, Adofo charged towards it his spear held high. Before he could throw the spear the creature flicked its tail. Adofo floated through the air and landed on some bushes, branches broke, bugs fluttered into the air as he landed. The creature turned its attention to Henry. He wanted to stand his ground, but was petrified and turned to run. Ampah saw his chance and threw his spear and the creature cried out in pain. Henry stopped and turned back to the creature. It was trying to pull the spear from its leg. Henry took a deep breath and charged but the creature flicked its tail hitting him on the shoulder. He sailed through the air and landed in a tree, he fell hitting every branch as he did, and he ended up hanging on a branch about three feet from the ground.

The creature stumbled still trying to pull the spear from its leg. Adofo charged and buried his spear in its other leg. The creature screamed and fell backwards. Ampah ran up to it, set his foot on its leg, and pulled his spear out. The creature screamed in pain and for a second it sounded like it was pleading for its life. Henry scrambled to retrieve his machete and ran over to help. He was almost to the creature when it raised its tail and took aim at Ampah. Henry dove into the air swinging his machete. He heard the creature scream as the machete sliced through its tail. Ampah had his spear in his hand; he stuck it into the creature’s chest. Adofo walked up and helped Henry to his feet.

“For a second I thought you grew wings,” he said laughing

“I was driven by fear my friend,” Henry said Ampah stood his right foot on top of the creature. The villagers stood over the lifeless beast.

“Where do you think it came from?” Henry asked. Adofo took a deep breath,

“I have no clue, but I bet the Ligaroos have something to do with it.” He said. Ampah pulled his spear from the creature’s chest. They stood over it for a second then turned and walked away. They had went about four feet when the bushes began to rustle. They turned around. The creature’s body had melted into the tall grass. They ran back to where it lay and to their surprise the creature had transformed into a human being. Ampah knelt down next to the man; his skin was as dark as midnight, his body was ropey with muscles and he had salt and pepper hair. His dark eyes were open wide with fear.

“I know him,” Ampah said, “He was on the ship with us,” Adofo bent down to get a better look at the man.

“I remember him he was taken with our parents. The Ligaroo is using the power of the Pedro Loa to create monsters of their captives.” He said and they were silent for a second.

“How do we know when it is our family that is the monsters?” Henry asked, Adofo turned to him a sad look in his eyes,

“We don’t,” he said. There was silence again then Henry spoke,

“We should bury him,” he said, Adofo and the others nodded and one by one, they set about the solemn task of burying the man.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

From Obeah

Akosua got to the tunnel that led to the path down the mountain, but turned up instead of going down. She walked to a rock that was the highest point on the mountain and looked out at the darkness. She stood and took the spear out of its goat skin holster, and held it up to the sky, and stood there for a second. The spear glowed so Henry positioned himself behind a rock and watched. Akosua stood her head to the sky as she mumbled. Suddenly out of the dark a figure approached her. Henry ran to her, but he slipped on the pebbles on the path and fell. He looked up just in time to see the figure reach out and grab the spear. Akosua tried to hold on to it, but stumbled and fell off the rock. Henry scrambled on his hands and knees trying to get to her.

As he was getting back up to his feet the mountain lit up with a brilliant white light. He stood up and watched the figure; it stood lit up just like Akosua when she first touched the spear. The blinding white reached the sky. And even the stars were like shadows against it. Henry heard the figure laugh as the power of the spear rushed through him. Light shot out of his mouth, as if trying to from the noise that his laughter made. Suddenly the figure screamed, as the light from the spear grew brighter. It lit up the mountain top and the jungle thousands of feet below. Henry looked over the edge, he saw the tops of trees that grew out of the mountain side. Birds soared around the mountain disturbed by the light, wild goats retreated stumbling on the rocks. Henry put his hands over his eyes to protect them from the light. Small white beams penetrated the clouds, giving the impression that solid streaks of raindrops was showering down from the heavens. The figure screamed in pain, as white light exploded from his body making him look translucent, as small beams of white light escaped his body. Henry got to the base of the rock and looked around for Akosua, but did not see her. He began to run towards the figure using his hand to block the light. Just as he was about to reach out and grab the spear Akosua appeared next to him,

“No Henry!” She screamed. Henry stopped and looked at the figure, the light had begun to dim and the mountain top became dark, until it was like before the figure grabbed the spear. Akosua reached out and grabbed the spear and the figure’s hand broke off, its fingers still wrapped around the stem of the spear. Henry stood and watched the figure; it was motionless, like a statue in a Catholic church. There was no more light coming from it, it stood just a dull white glow. Akosua touched it and put her finger on her tongue,

“Pure salt” she said. Slowly the feet of the figure began to crumble and it fell over the side of the mountain, Henry heard it hit the trees on its way down. He walked up to Akosua stood holding the spear

“That was the former Bokor leader. I knew someone had followed us here. It is a shame he could not join us,” she said as she put the spear back in its holster. It hung down her back almost touching the ground.

“Are you O K?” Henry asked. Akosua smiled,

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Storyteller

From Obeah

The Ligaroo King circled around her. Every muscle in his body twitched, his teeth snarled, his breathing came in small bursts. She looked at him, her body tense, and her face hot with anger. All the fear was gone, as she turned around following his every move. This was the moment, the moment when her people will be free. She raised her right hand over her shoulders and got the Spear of Salt. It blinked florescent, as she faced down the Ligaroo King. His red eyes sparked in the yellow glow from the torches, his mouth opened wide, as he threw his head back and howled.

“This is the end of the path for you little witch, can you see the crossroads, and can you see Baron Samedi waiting for you? You and all your friends will not leave this island free. I will make you my slaves yet.” He said, and then charged, swinging his sword. Akosua raised the spear above her head, and the sound of metal hitting metal echoed above the sound of the battle. They struggled, face to face, Akosua barely able to breath because of the stench coming from the beast’s mouth.
“Where is your Obatala now? I don’t see him here to save you. You will make the perfect sacrifice for Baron Samedi,” he said as he pushed. Akosua growled as she strained to push him away.

“It is you who will not get off this island. It is written, that good will always prevail over evil. We will win and we will be free.” She said and pushed as hard as she could. The Ligaroo King staggered back and looked at her, as if surprised at how strong she was. Slowly a smile covered his face. Then without saying a word he charged at her. Akosua sidestepped and swung the spear, the sharp edge of it nipped the Ligaroo King on his side. The beast looked down at his side and cupped the wound with his hand, then looked back at Akosua.

He raised his head and howled with anger, then charged, swinging his sword. The girl tried to use her spear to ward him off, but the blow was so powerful she stumbled and fell. She lay looking up at the Ligaroo King. He had a triumph smile on his face. He brought his sword down, and she rolled to her right. The sharp edges of the sword hit the ground next to her head sending a puff of dirt into the air. The beast raised his sword again, and then brought it down again. Akosua rolled to her left, got to her knees and scrambled to her feet. Before she was fully prepared, the beast came at her. She stumbled to her right and jabbed him with the spear. The Ligaroo gasped with surprise, like someone had knocked the wind out of him. He swung his arm, knocking the spear away from his body. Steamed hissed out of his arm where the spear touched him. His sword fell to the ground, and he looked at Akosua, and for the first time there was weakness in his eyes. He retreated to his throne gasping for breath. Akosua followed him, the spear held over her head.

The Ligaroo King leaned on his throne, his hand outstretched, as if motioning her to wait.

“Sometimes the people you love are the very ones who betray you,” as he held his side and gasped for breath. Akosua stood, looked at him an expression of puzzlement on her face. The Ligaroo chuckled, coughed, blood spouted out of his mouth creating a mist of red in front of him. He took another deep breath; Akosua took a step towards him,

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

From the novel Obeah

Later that night, as they lay dozing under the night sky, Henry saw Akosua pick up the spear and walk off into the night. He got up and followed her silhouette into the bushes. Just before she entered the jungle she stopped and looked back. Henry dropped to the ground and lay still. Akosua smiled in the dark, then turned and kept walking. Henry got up and followed her into the jungle.

Akosua got to the tunnel that led to the path down the mountain, but turned up instead of going down. She walked to a rock that was the highest point on the mountain and looked out at the darkness. She stood and took the spear out of its goat skin holster, and held it up to the sky, and stood there for a second. The spear glowed so Henry positioned himself behind a rock and watched. Akosua stood her head to the sky as she mumbled. Suddenly out of the dark a figure approached her. Henry ran to her, but he slipped on the pebbles on the path and fell. He looked up just in time to see the figure reach out and grab the spear. Akosua tried to hold on to it, but stumbled and fell off the rock. Henry scrambled on his hands and knees trying to get to her.

As he was getting back up to his feet the mountain lit up with a brilliant white light. He stood up and watched the figure; it stood lit up just like Akosua when she first touched the spear. The blinding white reached the sky. And even the stars were like shadows against it. Henry heard the figure laugh as the power of the spear rushed through him. Light shot out of his mouth, as if trying to from the noise that his laughter made. Suddenly the figure screamed, as the light from the spear grew brighter. It lit up the mountain top and the jungle thousands of feet below. Henry looked over the edge, he saw the tops of trees that grew out of the mountain side. Birds soared around the mountain disturbed by the light, wild goats retreated stumbling on the rocks. Henry put his hands over his eyes to protect them from the light. Small white beams penetrated the clouds, giving the impression that solid streaks of raindrops was showering down from the heavens. The figure screamed in pain, as white light exploded from his body making him look translucent, as small beams of white light escaped his body. Henry got to the base of the rock and looked around for Akosua, but did not see her. He began to run towards the figure using his hand to block the light. Just as he was about to reach out and grab the spear Akosua appeared next to him,

“No Henry!” She screamed. Henry stopped and looked at the figure, the light had begun to dim and the mountain top became dark, until it was like before the figure grabbed the spear. Akosua reached out and grabbed the spear and the figure’s hand broke off, its fingers still wrapped around the stem of the spear. Henry stood and watched the figure; it was motionless, like a statue in a Catholic church. There was no more light coming from it, it stood just a dull white glow. Akosua touched it and put her finger on her tongue,

“Pure salt” she said. Slowly the feet of the figure began to crumble and it fell over the side of the mountain, Henry heard it hit the trees on its way down. He walked up to Akosua stood holding the spear

“That was the former Bokor leader. I knew someone had followed us here. It is a shame he could not join us,” she said as she put the spear back in its holster. It hung down her back almost touching the ground.

“Are you O K?” Henry asked. Akosua smiled,

“Am fine, let’s get back to the camp,” she said and they walked down the path, through the bushes and back to the camp.

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Parts Obeah

Too real From the novel Obeah

After eating, Henry settled in for the night. Kwao and one of the Bokors were to take first watch; Henry and the boy were to take the second. He fell asleep the moment he lay down on the mat. Immediately, the dreams started. He was back in the Valley of the Weeping willow trees. He stood where there were no trees, the glow from the moon shined down on him. Silver light bounced of the creek in the distance. The La Diablesses were circling him, their white dresses misty in the light.

.”You are a fool; you should have come with us. A far worse fate awaits you on Jumbie Island.” They chanted. One of them came close and leaned in. Loose skin dangled of her face and brushed against his nose.

“You are no warrior, just the son of a slave driver. These people will turn on you and this time they will sacrifice you.“ She said, stood up strait, a dagger in her hand. In one sweeping motion, she brought it down. He felt his skin rip and blood meandered down the sides of his stomach. Henry tried to get up but she pushed him down. The others chanted, danced faster and faster, until they were a blur of white, then suddenly one of them was in front of him again. Those eyes like burning coals looked at him and suddenly he felt warm inside. She spoke, but all he heard was a humming noise. The La Disables’ threw her head back and laughed then floated away from Henry. Then she was right in front of him again, her corpse like face close to his, and she caressed his face with her rotted fingers. She grabbed the back of his head and kissed him. Henry pushed her away and she screamed.

“You can’t reject me!” lifted her dress and kicked him with her hoofed leg. Then she leaned down and licked the blood from his face. Henry tried to resist, but she was kissing him again. He pushed her away and she spat at him and piece of her tongue landed on his chest. He turned away from her, but looked back when she took her hands away. She was gone and replaced by the former Bokor leader. Henry looked around, he was tied to a pole and a fire blazed around his feet. The man’s face was painted red and blue, the hood on his robe covered his eyes.

“Am right behind you,” the man said. He sounded like they were both submerged in the ocean. The Bokor floated away and there was darkness for a second. He reappeared in the distance and floated towards Henry, a spear held over his head. He threw the spear and as if in slow motion it came at Henry. The tip of the spear sparkled in front of his face, and he shook violently,

Get up it’s your watch,” Kwao said. Henry slowly sat up and looked around. The others were asleep, Akosua lay by herself and Adobo was nowhere in sight. Henry stood up and stretched.

“Henry, Henry,” he turned and saw the boy sitting on a rock just above the campsite. Henry grabbed his spear and joined the boy.

 

http://www.amazon.com/OBEAH-Anderson-A-Charles-ebook/dp/B006OIRYYW/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1394887062&sr=8-10&keywords=obeah

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Music I like Storyteller

More carnival vibes, Jab Jab

Soca from 2013 carnival.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

Who is the Bokor

Bokors are featured in many Haitian tales and are often associated with the creation of ‘zombies’ by the use of a deadening brew or potion usually containing poison extracted from puffer fish. This potion makes the drinker appear to be dead and thus he is often buried; later, the bokor will return for the “corpse” and force it to do his bidding, such as manual labor. The “corpse” is often given deliriant drugs, mainly datura, which puts them in a detached, somewhat dreamlike state. Its state is likened to being mind controlled. The person is alive but in a state where they cannot control what they say or do; at this point, when the person has been “reanimated” from the grave, or at least is moving about working for the bokor, they can be termed “zombies.” However, some legends dispense with this more rational explanation, and have the bokor raise zombies from dead bodies whose souls have departed.

Also, bokors are said to work with zombi/zombie astrals – souls or spirits which are captured in a fetish and made to enhance the Bokor’s power. Bokors normally work with Loas Baron Samedi, Kalfou, Legba and Simbi (snake loa) plus in some cases they are said to work with Grand Bois, the loa of the forest.

Bokors are similar to the “root workers” of voodoo and New Orleans voodoo. Some may be priests of a vodou house. Bokor are usually chosen from birth, those who are believed to bear a great ashe (power). A Bokor can be, by worldy terms, good or evil, though some sources (Judeo-Christian) consider him an evil version of a houngan.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

Ghede

Papa Ghede is supposed to be the corpse of the first man who ever died. He is recognized as a short, dark man with a high hat on his head, who likes to smoke cheap cigars and eat apples. Papa Ghede is a psychopomp who waits at the crossroads to take souls into the afterlife. He is considered the good counterpart to Baron Samedi.