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Storyteller

45th Installment of Obeah

“Get up it’s your watch,” Kwao said. Henry slowly sat up and looked around. The others were asleep, Akosua lay by herself and Adobo was nowhere in sight. Henry stood up and stretched.

“Henry, Henry,” he turned and saw the boy sitting on a rock just above the campsite. Henry grabbed his spear and joined the boy.

“Great spot huh?” the boy said smiling, proud that he had discovered the rock. Henry climbed onto the rock and sat next to the boy. The sky was dark, except for the stars that twinkled silver above the trees. There seemed to be millions of them, each twinkled with its own rhythm. He saw the tops of the trees against the stars where the sky ended and the jungle began. A wolf howled in the jungle. Fireflies floated around them, and the boy cupped one in his hands and watched in amazement as small beams of light escaped through his fingers. The lone torch that lit up the camp popped and cracked in a slight wind.

“Do you remember your parents?” He asked, the boy did not respond for a second as if thinking of what to say.

“Sometimes, but it’s like am asleep and dreaming. I remember my father coming back from hunting, or my mother singing as she cooked. Then I remember my father being sick on the plantation, he had cuts all over his back.” The boy stopped talking and looked out into the darkness of the night. Henry did not say anything; he knew what the cuts were from.

“The old slave master beat him real bad,” The boy looked out at the jungle. In the light from the stars, Henry saw the sadness in his eyes. Then as if to change the subject the boy turned to him.

“Did your father hunt?” He asked,

“No, when I was little we lived in a city. Stone houses, carriages, and lots of people walking about. We rarely went into the countryside.” Henry said then drifted into thought. He was startled by movement in the bushes next to the camp site. Both him, and the boy looked in the direction of the noise. There it was again, it sounded like someone had stepped on a dry piece of wood.

“What was that?” Henry asked. The boy stood on the rock and peered into the bushes

“Must be a wolf,” he said, Henry got up and jumped off the rock. He slowly crept in the direction of the cracking wood. He walked into the bushes and stopped, his spear held above his head. His whole body tingled, and his muscles twitched, he was prepared to throw his spear. Just as he was about to throw the spear, Adobo walked out of the bushes,

“Whoa,” Adobo said and smiled.

“It’s me,” he said as he held his arms up, then turned to Henry and slapped him on his shoulder. Henry lowered his spear.

“Adobo, it is you, I almost threw my spear.” He said, Adobo laughed quietly.

“Nature called, sorry I startled you,” he said as he walked past Henry. Henry turned around and looked at him.

“Well back to bed,” Adobo said and walked away. Henry looked at him, then turned and looked at the bushes from where he had come. He walked over to the bushes and stepped in, nature was calling him too. He kicked something and almost fell. He looked down and saw a dead fox. It twitched and a blood circle formed around its head on the jungle’s floor.

“What in the?” he said. He jumped, his heart raced, and his skin felt like it was on fire. Henry shrugged, urinated against a tree trunk and walked back to the rock.

“What was it?” The boy asked. Henry sat down next to him.

“Adobo relieving himself,” Henry replied.

“Looks like he was attacked by a fox and he killed it.”

“I have seen him kill a giant cat with his bare hands. Adofo is a great warrior. I would like to be like him some day.

They sat in silence and looked out over the jungle. A star shot across the sky and disappeared behind the trees. A wake of vultures flew by, their bodies a mass shadow against the twinkling sky. Henry thought about the climb up the mountain and took a deep breath. He did that when he wanted to stop himself from being nervous. He was ready for anything now, evil spirits, La Disables’, Arawak’s, anything the Evil Loas would conjure. He had to do this to save his sister from the Ligaroos.

,

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POEMS Storyteller

Images not specific

Where the rats smile at you like children before an ice cream feast
Where cock roaches hiss like the harmony of a church choir right before repentance
A soul on the devil’s plated, seasoned with hate and greed, a feast for the damned
A priest with your heart in his hand, promising purgatory
Fire ants crawling right under your skin like a wave of volcanic lava
Sitting in a foxhole watching the scavengers feast on what is left of humanity
Laying in the dark with shadows for company, spirits lost between death and living
Dreaming where you live or living in a dream you wish you can forget.

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Storyteller

This Sunday Obeah Tune in

Ahhhh, looks like the Akans are on their way to get the Spear of Salt. Do you think the Ligaroo king will let them get it, or do you think he will be sending his most gruesome Jumbies to stop them.  I can tell you now, but then again what fun will that be. You must go on the journey with them, you must tune in on Sunday for the 42nd installment of Obeah. Do it because Papa Jumbie say so. Now lay down, sweet dream my little Jumbies.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

35th Installment of Obeah

The sun was going down in the west when they finally sat down to eat. Henry snacked on tropical fruit all afternoon, he could not help himself he was hungry. Akosua sat at the head of the middle table. Her smile radiated across the table, as she laughed and talked with everyone. Henry surveyed the spread. Maroon coloured sweet potatoes, earth tone grey yams, boiled green bananas, vegetables of all kinds sat on the table in calabash bowls. Yellow mangoes, bananas and sour soups, yellow and green paw paws, golden apples, red plumbs and yellow passion fruit spotted green in places. There was chicken, roasted pig, and a roasted goat sat in the middle of the table. Calabash bowls sat in front of every villager. Coconut shell cups with lime juice. Homemade vases lined the middle of each table with bright tropical coloured flowers. This was the most food he had seen in one sitting. It was even larger than the feasts the plantation owner had when he had guests from the Old Country. Akosua stood up,

“Our journey was successful; we have convinced the Bokors to join us in the fight against the Ligaroo King and his followers. We have overcome many obstacles, but this is only the beginning of our fight. The Bokors will come to our village and from here we will leave to retrieve the Spear of Salt. We will build more huts to accommodate our guests. With the grace of Yemaya and Obatala, we will be victorious. But today we will rejoice, eat, drink and be merry.” She said and lifted her coconut shell cup.

“To our health, our success, and for the safe return of our people!” She said and the villagers cheered, some pounded their fists on the tables.

After they had eaten, they sat around the village too stuffed to move. Ampah was on a hammock tied between two mango trees, Adofo and Akosua lay on banana leaves next to Lassette who sat on a tree stump, Kwao and some of the boys were wrestling, their dreadlocks covered with sand. Henry sat in a tree branch looking down on the lazy group. Small children played with dogs and monkeys on the boundary where the village stopped and the jungle began. Lassette sat up,

“Why don’t the Ligaroo King come here himself and destroy the village?” She asked. Kwao and the boys stopped wrestling and looked over. Akosua spoke without sitting up,

“He has no reason to come here. He can send his Ligaroos warriors and Jumbies to kidnap anyone he wants. Plus he knows that we have to come to his island to free our parents, all he has to do is wait to get our strongest all in one place, then it will be easy for him to destroy us.” She said lazily. Lassette mumbled and leaned back looking up at the blue sky. She waited for a second then spoke again,

“How come the Gods and evil spirits don’t attack us themselves?” she asked. This time Akosua sat up.

“They have to possess someone to do their evil deeds. That is why the Arawak’s came, and the beast that Adofo and the boys killed turned into one of us. The evil Loas possessed them and when they are released from that possession they never remember what they did. It’s like the beliefs from your own homeland. Your devil can possess people and cause them to do evil deeds. Your god lives in you, but some of you are possessed by evil.” She said.” Lassette seemed satisfied with Akosua’s answer and settled down. Akosua lay back down, the ocean washed ashore on the beach in the distance; bees buzzed by and went into the jungle. The splash of the dolphins is heard as the wind swept in from the ocean. Henry closed his eyes as the coolness brushed his face. He needed this peaceful time because soon it would be time to go off to battle again.

Night descended on the island and the drummers began to play. The villagersdanced around the bonfire. Henry joined them and danced until his legs began to ache. The fire popped and cracked, and some of the children chased the sparks that floated into the air. Their voices echoed into the jungle, dogs howled and barked, some chasing the children that ran around the fire. Akosua and Adofo had disappeared to their special place on the small beach. Kwao was missing too. Henry knew that he was somewhere spying on the two lovers. It was late when he went back to his hut and flopped down on his bed. The events of the day played out in his head like a living dream. This was the most fun he had had since his mother died. He thought of his sister and said out loud,

“I am coming to rescue you,” his voice interrupting the crickets outside the hut. He fell asleep to images of him and his sister playing in the field behind their home in the Old Country.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

31st Installment of Obeah

CHAPTER 14

Adofo and Henry stood on a hill overlooking a valley. A small river meandered down the middle; the crystal water glittered like diamonds, yellow, blue and red flowers lined the banks of the river. Henry sat down and he felt the cool dew on the grass soak through his pants. Adofo sat down next to him. They had walked most of the day and needed to take a rest.

“How can a place so beautiful have such evil things happen?” Henry asked, Adofo was drinking from a water pouch,

“You put man in anything beautiful and he finds a way to bring evil to it. Birds don’t enslave each other; butterflies don’t put evil spells on dragon flied. The difference between them and us is we have the intelligence justify that it is our nature to be evil, at least that is what my father once told me.” He replied. Henry scanned the valley. A flock of parrots flew into the trees on the other side of the jungle. Henry followed them as they glided over the water and back into the jungle.

“My father said that sometimes evil deeds are necessary for progress. My sister said it was his ways of making his job not seem as bad as it is,” Henry said. Adofo were looking around.

“Hey look,” Adofo said pointing. Henry looked in the direction he had pointed. A group of five people emerged from the jungle and walked along the river bank.

“It’s Akosua and the others,” he said and got up and started walking. They stumbled down the mild decline trying not to fall. Rocks tumbled down the hill taking chunks of mud with them. They reached the river and waded through a part of it that was ankle deep. The cool water felt good in the afternoon heat. Fish swam out of the way with every step they took.

“Akosua!” Adofo shouted. Akosua and her group stopped and looked around.

“Hey!” Adofo shouted again. Akosua saw them and began running. They met and stood in the middle of the river, the water rushed past their waist. It was crystal, until the point where it touched their bodies, then it was greyish, white. Akosua’s dress floated above the water, it looked like it was about to wash away with the rushing swell. Kwao stood his eyes ablaze with jealousy. Adofo and Akosua stood for a moment holding each other, and then looked into each other’s eyes. The parrots flew overhead, their feathers a rainbow of colours in the tropical blue sky. Kwao stepped forward.

“You were told to stay in the village,” he said walking past Adofo bumping him on his shoulder as he went.

“I wanted to make sure the lady I love was safe,” Adofo said, smiling at Akosua. Kwao kept walking trying hard not to look at Adofo.

“Come on, we have to get back to the village since no one is in charge,” he said.

“Ampah can handle it,” he said. The two warriors walked up to Adofo and hugged him,

“It’s good to see you friend,” one of them said as he smiled. Lassette walked past him looked at him then looked at Akosua and smiled. Adofo looked at Akosua.

“Long story,” she said “I will tell you when we get back to the village.” She said then took Adofo’s hand and they followed the others up the hill and back into the jungle.

It was late afternoon, hot and muggy as they walked across a field of wild cotton bushes. Small cotton balls floated around in the air around them and into the jungle. Bugs flew between them as if hypnotized by the sweat that glistened off their bodies. Kwao had not spoken since Adofo and Henry showed up. He pushed ahead trying not to listen to what was being said behind him. Lassette walked behind Akosua and Adofo. She was breathing hard, her mouth open, her eyes red from being in the sun too long. Her beige coloured dress was ripped and came to just above her knees. There were scratches on her legs from the bushes and thorns that ripped at her skin. Adofo and Akosua talked, their voices the loudest thing in an otherwise quiet jungle. Kwao stopped,

“Shhhh” he said, he looked around for a second. Adofo and Akosua walked up next to him. He stood like a cat; his eyes scanned the jungle, his spear at the ready.

“What is it?” Adofo asked. Kwao looked at him as if to silence him. They stood for a minute then Kwao relaxed.

“Stop the chattering and stay alert,” he said and began walking. Adofo caught up with him,

“We saw what looked like boats coming towards the island earlier,” he whispered.

“And you are just telling me that,”Kwao said. Adofo looked a little exasperated

“I just remembered,” he said, Kwao rolled his eyes,

“If you were not so captivated by love you would have remembered,” Kwao retorted.

“I am telling you now so be alert.” Adofo said and he stared at Bartholomew.

“Make sure and let the boys know,” Kwao barked and walked off.

They got to a part of the jungle where the trees stood tall and there were no bushes around their trunks. The red top soil was hard and it crunched when they stepped on it. A peacock trotted by, its tail a glitter of colours. They stopped and watched it go by. Lassette tried to step in front of it, but the bird evaded her and lumbered away. Henry took a drink of water, and then brushed the back of his hand across his forehead.

“Its bloody hot here,” he said, Kwao looked back at him,

“What Kindoki can’t take a little heat?” he said then snickered.

“Shhhh!” Adofo said, Kwao gave him an evil look and was about to say something when an arrow whizzed by his head and stuck in the tree next to him. They froze for a second, then there was a shrilling war cry and an army of men rushed out of the jungle screaming. Henry pulled out his machete and braced himself. Adofo bumped into him,

“Take Akosua and the lady and go hide,” he said.

Categories
Parts Obeah Storyteller

29th installment of OBEAH

It was two in the morning, the skies twinkled with stars and owls hooted in the jungle. Akosua was asleep on a straw mat under a tree with big leaves when she felt the presence of someone next to her. She opened her eyes, but there was no one there. She went back to sleep. Suddenly there was a face next to her. Most of the face was human, but the mouth and the nose were that of a wolf. The creature opened its mouth, its fangs bared. Saliva dripped and landed on the dirt next to Akosua’s face. She felt its breath against her neck; the stench permeated the air around her, an animalistic odor that stifled her. She sat up and looked around. The jungle was silent, the fire smoldered in its small pit. She looked over at the others, the warrior sand Lassette were asleep on their mats. Kwao sat against a tree rubbing his eyes as if he had just woken up. He looked over at her,

“Having a nightmare?” he asked. Akosua yawned then spoke,

“Not sure,” she said, “It seemed so real,”

“It was not real, I would protect you if it was,” Kwao said, his eyes sparkled red in the yellow light form the dying fire. He smiled but in the dim light, it looked more like a menacing glare.

“You should get some sleep we have to make it back to the village tomorrow.” Akosua said. Kwao looked at her, his head was tilted downwards, the blacks of his eyes turned up.

“Why wouldn’t you let me love you? I can give you all that you want in life. Adofo is just a dumb warrior; I have the emotions to make you feel loved.” He said Akosua sat up, a firefly floated in the air between them.

“Kwao you have to stop this we are friends, at least I would like to think that we are. But there can never be anything more than that between us.” She said. Kwao got up and walked over to her and sat down.

“I have always loved you, seeing you with him hurt my heart,” he said as he caressed her face. She pulled back a little, but that did not detour Kwao’s advances. He leaned in; his eyes closed and tried to kiss her. Akosua jerked away and scrambled to her feet. Kwao sat; his hand still outstretched looking up at her.

“Go to sleep Kwao, I will forget this ever happened.” She said her face hot with embarrassment. Kwao stood up and hesitated like he was about to say something. A flock of bats flew from one tree to the next screeching. Kwao did not say anything, he just turned and walked back over to the tree and sat down.

Akosua walked over to where the warriors and Lassette lay and sat down against a tree. The sky was dark; there were no stars, no moon, just darkness. The leaves in the trees whistled as a slight breeze blew through the jungle. Akosua thought of Adofo. She wondered what he and the other villagers were doing. Did the Ligaroos attack while she was gone? A star shot across the sky leaving a streak of white in its wake. Akosua fell asleep looking up at the sky.

Adofo and Henry were walking on a cliff that overlooked the ocean. They had decided to take a different route to the Bokor’s village to avoid any sneak attacks by the evil spirits. The sea water was dark but frothy white where the waves crashed into the rocks. The sun shined down causing the ocean to glitter blinding Henry whenever he looked out to sea. Flying fish jumped out of the water, flocks of seagulls soared just over the surface. Adofo stopped and looked out at the ocean. He saw five dark spots in the distance gliding towards the island. He put his hand over his eyes to shield the sun and squinted to get a better look.

“What is it?” Henry asked. Adofo looked for a second.

“Don’t know looks like small boats to me,” he said. Henry placed his hand over his eyes and looked out onto the ocean.

“Boats, do you think the Ligaroos are coming to attack?” He asked.

“I doubt it, they only attack at night, but the Ligaroo king has enough power to change that. He can use anyone to attack us.” He said. They stood and watched as the boats came closer to Akan Island.

“Lets go, we have to warn Akosua and the others.” He said as he turned away from the ocean and headed towards the jungle.

“We will go the way Akosua would use to get back to the village.” He said as he walked away from the cliff.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

28 installment of OBEAH

“For Christ sake, cut, cut, cut!” Henry screamed. Finally, the plant went limp, and the funnel flopped to the ground, and the hairs wilted immediately. Henry cut Adofo out of the thick leaf. Adofo exhaled as he struggled to get air to his lungs. Henry tried to pull him up, but his arms were covered with slim. He stopped trying and stood over Adofo as he composed himself. Adofo was finally able to stand up and wiped his eyes, and blew slime from his nose.

“Are you O K?” Henry asked. Adofo tried to talk, but instead a glob of slime spouted out of his mouth. He coughed and bent over and threw up. Henry tapped him on his back and slowly, Adofo stopped retching and stood up still gasping for air.

“I will be O K,” he said between gasps then bent down and picked up his spear.

“Thank you I owe you one,” he said reaching his hand out. Henry took it getting slime on his hand. Adofo smiled.

“Sorry,” he said and he touched Henry’s face. Henry wiped the slime off.

“If you were not covered with snort I would give you a trashing,” he said and they laughed. The jungle was quiet, the big flowers swayed in a mild wind, the animals had disappeared into the jungle, and the scent of the rose bushes was even stronger. Adofo turned to Henry,

“Let’s get out of here, and stay away from those plants.” Adofo said.

                                          CHAPTER 13

It was early evening and swarms of bugs flew around in the jungle. Water dripped off the leaves from the afternoon rain that created a scent of wet wood. Baby birds chirped as their mothers brought them food, foxes barked in their dens. Akosua was lying on a straw mat her eyes closed. She felt like someone was looking at her and opened her eyes. Kwao sat against a tree staring at her. She sat up and looked around,

“You are beautiful even when you day dream,” he said. Akosua rubbed her eyes and yawned.

“You are even beautiful when you yawn,” he said. Akosua stopped and looked at him.

“What has gotten into you, have the heat fried your brain?” she asked and smiled. Kwao looked down at the ground. He was shifting a leaf with a piece of stick.

“I have always had special feelings for you,” he stuttered, shifting nervously against the tree. Akosua blinked surprised,

“I am flattered, but you know am in love with Adofo,” she said. A monkey swung in a tree above them, the branch broke and the monkey fell, but grabbed onto another branch before he hit the ground. Kwao looked at her, a flash of anger in his eyes.

“I am better for you than he is,” he said, but did not look at her,

“Its because am the son of a plantation owner isn’t it?” And before Akosua could respond he spoke again,

“I can offer you eternal life,” he said, Akosua looked at him,

“What do you mean by eternal life?” she asked. Kwao got up

“Never mind, I just wanted to let you know how I feel,” he said and walked into the jungle. Akosua got up and went over to where the two warriors and the blond woman sat. A pot of food bubbled over a fire; its small orange glow flickered in the dark. Akosua sat down next to the woman,

“He has a mean disposition,” the blond woman said and looked in the direction where Kwao had went into the jungle. Akosua smiled an apologetic smile,

“He has had a hard life, this is the first time he have been accepted anywhere, he still have to learn how to trust.” She said and looked at the woman. Her blond hair was matted almost like Akosua’s dreadlocks; her speech was different from the captains, she may have come from a different tribe in the Old Country. The woman looked at Akosua her blue eyes twinkled in the light from the fire.

“What was his problem now?” she asked, Akosua lowered her head embarrassed.

“He just has some feeling he needs to resolve,” She said her face felt hot as she smiled.

“What is your name?” Amelia asked just to change the topic. The woman put a piece of mango in her mouth and chewed. After she swallowed she responded.

“My name is Lassette; I lived on the French island where the first successful slave uprising occurred. My father worked for a plantation owner. Akosua looked into her blue eyes. She was not much older than Akosua,

“”How old are you?” Akosua asked, Lassette hesitated, and she knew that giving her age to an Obeah woman may not be the best thing to do, but this girl had saved her life.

“I am twenty,” the woman responded.

“How was it on that island during the uprising?” Akosua asked,

“It was horrifying. The night before the fighting I heard the drums playing and the slaves chanting, I knew what they were doing, I had seen one of their services. The animal sacrifices gave me nightmares for weeks. The day they revolted, we were prepared to escape. They chased us to the ocean and we were able to flee the island,” She stopped talking and looked up at the grey clouds.

“I stayed in the colonies, but my father and mother went back to the Old Country. I believe that slavery is barbaric, but my father believed that it was necessary to build the colonies. He disowned me.” She said. Akosua shifted to become more comfortable.

“I have been going from island to island opposing the slave traders and plantation owners,” Lassette said,

“How ironic,” Akosua said, “You were about to be sacrificed by the very people whose freedom you are fighting for,” Lassette nodded,

“It’s a chance that’s worth taking,” she said and smiled. In the dark Kwao spoke,

“What do we have here, a kindoki do gooder?” he said walking out of the bushes. One of the warriors looked up at him,

“Stop talking Kwao, no one wants to hear your hatred right now,” he shouted, Kwao walked over and grabbed the boy’s dreadlocks.

“You shut your mouth!” He shouted, the boy grabbed Kwao’s arm and stood up. They glared at each other.

“That’s enough,” Akosua said, neither warrior relinquish,

“Go for a walk Kwao and calm yourself down,” she said. Kwao hesitated.

“First Henry and now her, you can let these people into your lives but me, I refuse to trust them,” He said and looked at Lassette with pure disdain,

“Kindoki!” Kwao said then walked off.

“I don’t blame him I would be angry too,” Lassette said, Akosua leaned over and looked into the pot,

“He is a good person, but his anger may destroy him,” Akosua said.

Night slowly descended on the jungle and with it came all the sounds that were not heard in the daytime. Frogs croaked and mosquitoes buzzed, bugs swam around the flame, and one of the warriors put a lid over the pot. They sat mere shadows next to the fire, each with their own thoughts.

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Storyteller

20th installment of Obeah

“Step aside little girl let grownups take care of this.” He said and pushed Akosua aside retrieved the machete and walked up to the woman.

“Savages!” the woman screamed, her blue eyes sparkled behind the locks of blond hair that hung down in front of her face. The leader walked up to her until his face was directly in front of her,

“We are the savages, we are the savages. Have your walked down to the beach and watched your reflection in the waves. It was your people who brought us here, it is your people who keep us captive, and it is your people who are inflecting pain on my people!” he shouted. The woman whimpered tears rolled down her cheeks.

“Enough!” Akosua shouted, “Vengeance will not be your salvation.” The Leader turned to her and even with the paint covering his face, the expression of anger and hatred was still pronounced. He raised his arm as if he was going to strike Akosua, but his arm stopped in midair. The Borkors watched, as their leader stood helpless. Akosua turned to them,

“I promise you we can defeat the Ligaroos. All we need is faith and Yemaya and the Radas will help us,” she said,

“Why should we follow you, you are just a girl,” One of the Bokors asked. Before Akosua could respond another Bokor stepped forward,

“Because, she is the chosen one that the Loas have promised us,” he said as he walked up and stood next to Akosua. He was a giant of a man that towered over everyone.

“What does that have to do with anything?” the first Bokor asked. Akosua turned to him.

“There is a spear on Nkyene Mountain; it is the only thing that will kill the Ligaroo King. I need to retrieve it and we need your help to get there.” The first Bokor that spoke shook his head,

“Well why do we need you, we can go get it ourselves.” He said, the giant Bokor looked down at his fellow villager,

“Because she is the only one that can use it,” He said,

“I knew your mother; she was a good person, the best Obeah woman I ever knew. I was with her when she hid the spear. I know how to get to Nkyene Mountain. We trusted your mother and thus we can trust her daughter.” He said Akosua smiled. The man stood seven feet tall, his large hands gesturing as he spoke The Bokor leader still stood motionless, the giant Bokor looked over at him,

“Our leader was blinded by his hatred and quest for vengeance. The captain, before he became the Ligaroo king, had whipped the leader’s wife in front the whole village because she had ran away. She never recovered, and died from infections” He said. Red and blus paint striped across his bald head from side to side and down his face. He turned to the congregation of Bokors,

“We have freedom in this jungle, now; we want to live in peace.” He shouted, they all mumbled their agreement. Akosua stepped closer to him and peered into his face.

“Oh yes, I remember you now, your name is Donkor, my mother called you the gentle giant.” Akosua said. Donkor smiled flashing two perfect rows of white teeth. Akosua reached out and touched his shoulder,

“Help us and together we will free our people. Yemaya said that they are all still alive on the Jumbie Island. The Ligaroo king has turned them into Jumbies.” Donkor smiled at her then turned to the congregation.

“I think we should listen to her, she is the chosen one, the one we have heard stories about. Far too long we have tried the dark side, now we must go back to the ways of our Ancestors, be Hougans again.” He said his deep voice booming above the popping fire. The congregation erupted with cheers, the drummers’ began playing. Donkor raised his arm.

“We will join forces with the young Obeah woman’s village and together we will destroy the Ligaroo king. Freedom from tyranny will soon come.” He said. The Bokors danced, their bodies twisting with joy and relief. Akosua motioned for Kwao to cut the women down; he was less than gentle with her. The woman fell to the ground at Akosua’s feet,

“Thank you, thank you.” She sobbed. Akosua reached down, took her arm and helped her up. The woman threw her arms around Akosua sobbing uncontrollably.

“Take her to our hut,” Akosua said, Kwao hesitated, but followed Akosua’s instructions. Donkor turned to Akosua.

“What about him.” He asked and pointed to the leader. Akosua reached over and touched the man and he crumbled to the ground. Donkor motioned for two of the Bokors, and they stepped forward, picked the leader up, and carried him past the dancing crowd.

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Parts Obeah Storyteller

From Obeah

They stood in a large room. There were twelve feet tall pillars that held up the stoned ceiling. The room was square and there were no windows, just the flicker of the lights from the torches that lined the walls. Shadows danced on the walls and on the floor, as a mysterious breeze swept through the room. On the far side, a wooden door opened, it creaked disturbing the eerie silence. Slowly Ampah’s mother walked out followed by the little people. They were so excited they were barely able to contain themselves. They jumped up and down clapping their hands and shouting. They walked to the centre of the room and stopped forming a circle around Ampah’s mother.

“Come get her boy, is that not the reason you are here?” The little woman said poking Ampahs mother on her side with her club,

“Go ahead mother, sing for you little boy,” she said then giggled. Ampah’s mother began to sing. He recognized the melody from his childhood. His mother sang that to him when he was younger and too afraid of the dark. Ampah started to move towards them but Akosua held him back. She looked around and saw shadows move against the wall next to a hallway to the left of the little people. About ten shadows formed on the walls and then a line of Ju Jus came into the room. With every step they took small bells jingled echoing in the empty space. They wore colourful outfits that had small mirrors stuck all over. Their faces were covered with powder, making them look chalk white. Dark vacant holes were where their eyes should be. They had white gloves on, and held small pouches that they shook over their heads as they moved. Their clothes were baggy, giving the impression that there was air between their skin and the thin material of their garments. The pants they wore came down to just above their knees and were lined with frills. As they stomped, they chanted, their voices deep and guttural.

“Baron Samedi ou prel pini,” They stopped in front of the little people and evil smiles appeared on their faces. Their black eyes turned white then black again, their tongues were black and darted in and out of their mouths.

“Short Knees!” Akosua shouted,

The Short Knees stopped stomping and stood silent for a second holding the pouches above their heads. Then in a blur they brought the pouches down spraying powder into the air. The room became a thick white mist that blinded Akosua and her warriors. They coughed and sneezed, as powder floated into the air, then fell to the floor,, turning the brick floor from dark red to white. The Short Knees was stomping again, the jingle of the bells and white powder made it feel like Christmas and All Saints were the same celebration. When the powder settled, and Akosua and her warriors were able to see again, Ampah’s mother, the little people and the Short Knees had disappeared. Akosua sneezed then looked up. Standing before them were eight Soucouyants, the wives of the Ligaroos, they were just as fierce as their husbands. The devil women stood, their skinless bodies glistened in the light from the torches, salvia dripped from their mouths, and their red eyes stared intently at Akosua and her warriors. Akosua took the club that was soaked in the salt from Nykene Mountain from her belt and prepared for an attack. Suddenly the Soucouyants attacked. The first beast charged at Akosua and morphed into a bear. At first it came at Akosua on all four legs, but when it was close to her it stood up. The beast towered over her, its mouth open, its head trashing from side to side sending saliva floating everywhere. It swung its large paw just as Akosua swung her club.

The Soucouyant behind her changed into a cougar, its teeth almost as big as a ram’s horn. It jumped at Ampah; its large body blocked the light from the torch behind it, and for a second Ampah was not prepared for the attack and was knocked to the ground. The cougar stood over him saliva dripped from its mouth onto Ampah’s face. The boy fumbled on his belt to retrieve his pouch with the salt pellets, then grinded a handful into the cougar’s eyes. The beast roared, then jumped off of him and disappeared into the dark. The last two Soucouyants turned into giant wolves. Their canine scent filled the air as they rushed at the warriors. The warriors retaliated, swinging their clubs, warding off their attackers

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Parts Obeah

Blood is all they want (Soucouyants)

“Baron Samedi ou prel pini,” They stopped in front of the little people and evil smiles appeared on their faces. Their black eyes turned white then black again, their tongues were black and darted in and out of their mouths.

“Short Knees!”  Akosua shouted,

The Short Knees stopped stomping and stood silent for a second holding the pouches above their heads. Then in a blur they brought the pouches down spraying powder into the air.  The room became a thick white mist that blinded Akosua and her warriors. They coughed and sneezed, as powder floated into the air, then fell to the floor,, turning the brick floor from dark red to white. The Short Knees was stomping again, the jingle of the bells and white powder made it feel like Christmas and All Saints were the same celebration. When the powder settled, and Akosua and her warriors were able to see again, Ampah’s mother, the little people and the Short Knees had disappeared. Akosua sneezed then looked up.  Standing before them were eight Soucouyants, the wives of the Ligaroos, they were just as fierce as their husbands. The devil women stood, their skinless bodies glistened in the light from the torches, salvia dripped from their mouths, and their red eyes stared intently at Akosua and her warriors. Akosua took the club that was soaked in the salt from Nykene Mountain from her belt and prepared for an attack. Suddenly the Soucouyants attacked.  The first beast charged at Akosua and morphed into a bear. At first it came at Akosua on all four legs, but when it was close to her it stood up. The beast towered over her, its mouth open, its head trashing from side to side sending saliva floating everywhere. It swung its large paw just as Akosua swung her club.

The Soucouyant behind her changed into a cougar, its teeth almost as big as a ram’s horn. It jumped at Ampah; its large body blocked the light from the torch behind it, and for a second Ampah was not prepared for the attack and was knocked to the ground. The cougar stood over him saliva dripped from its mouth onto Ampah’s face. The boy fumbled on his belt to retrieve his pouch with the salt pellets, then grinded a handful into the cougar’s eyes. The beast roared, then jumped off of him and disappeared into the dark. The last two Soucouyants turned into giant wolves. Their canine scent filled the air as they rushed at the warriors. The warriors retaliated, swinging their clubs, warding off their attackers.

Several large snakes slithered towards the warriors, then stopped and stood straight up in s-shaped forms. They hissed, showing fangs as long as the clubs that the little people carried. They reared their heads back preparing to strike. The warriors moved in unison and as the snake’s heads came forward they swung their clubs. The snaked fell to the ground, steam floating from their bodies where the clubs had struck them. They turned and slithered away, disappearing beyond the light form the torches.

Akosua and her warriors stood waiting for the next wave of attacks. The room was filled with the sounds of roars, growls and hissing. Akosua swung her club just as the bear came at her, hitting the beast on the chest, its paw came close to her face, but when the animal was hit with the salted club it morphed back into Soucouyants. It stood and looked at Akosua, then at the others, a surprised expression on its face. Akosau turned and saw that one of the snakes had wrapped around one of the warriors. The young man gasped for air. She ran over to him and struck the snake with the club. The reptile immediately morphed and retreated to where the other Soucouyants stood. A wolf charged at them, but right before it could slam into Akosua, Ampah struck it with his club, and the animal morphed in midair landing upright on its feet. Then as suddenly as the attack started, it ended and the room was empty.

Akosua and the warriors stood, their clubs at the ready, anticipating another wave of attacks. Suddenly, the torches went out and they were plunged into darkness. Akosua’s skin tightened, her muscles constricted, and sweat rolled down her forehead.

“I can’t see anything,” Ampah said,

“Stand your ground,” Akosua said. The Soucouyants came at them in the dark, their voices echoing in the empty room. Akosua was grabbed from behind and she felt teeth pressing down on her neck. She twisted her body and threw her attacker off. The beast grunted as she hit the ground. Another Soucouyant jumped on her and wrapped her arm around her neck. The girl struggled to escape, spinning around, causing powder to fill the air. She heard the screams of her friends as they struggled to fight off the assailants.  Slowly, the spear glowed, filling the room with white light. The Soucouyants seemed stunned by the light, and the one that had its arm around Akosua’s neck loosened her hold. Akosua took the opportunity to retrieve the bag of salt from her belt, took out a handful, and threw it into the beast’s face. The Soucouyant howled, covering her face with her hands. Steam floated off her face. Mixture of melted flest and loose skin ran down her hand and dropped onto the floor. The other Sooucouyants stood, as if hypnotized by the light.